Kelly Clarkson on Her New Album, ‘The Voice’ and Standing Up to Clive Davis

Kelly Clarkson Power of Women Variety

 

Throughout her career, Kelly Clarkson has paid homage to great divas, from Aretha Franklin to Whitney Houston. But on her new album, “Meaning of Life,” she borrows from another rock star: Michelle Obama. On the last track, “Go High,” Clarkson belts out: “When you go low I go high / I go high, I go high / When you go low I go high.” Doesn’t that sound familiar? “Yes, obviously,” Clarkson says. It’s from “the speech heard around the world.”

Clarkson, who co-wrote the song, says she was inspired by Obama’s address in July 2016 at the Democratic National Convention. “I remember seeing it on TV and just being floored,” she says. “You don’t have to be a politician to have experienced taking the high road. I think that’s a lot of us in whatever you do in life.”

 

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Nelly has been arrested after a woman accused the rapper of raping her in his tour bus in a town near Seattle. Nelly’s

Nelly rape

Nelly was arrested on Saturday after a woman accused the rapper of raping her in his tour bus in a town near Seattle.

Nelly’s attorney, Scott Rosenblum, firmly denied the “completely fabricated allegation” on Saturday morning.

“Nelly is the victim of a completely fabricated allegation,” Rosenblum said in a statement to Variety. “Our initial investigation clearly establishes this allegation is devoid of credibility and is motivated by greed and vindictiveness. I am confident, once this scurrilous accusation is thoroughly investigated, there will be no charges. Nelly is prepared to address and pursue all legal avenues to redress any damage caused by this clearly false allegation.”

According to the Auburn Police Department, officers arrested the Grammy winner, whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes Jr., on Saturday at 3:48 a.m. in his tour bus.

He was taken into custody and booked less than an hour later.

Nelly had performed at the White River Amphitheater in King County just hours before the incident, which is still being investigated by Auburn Police. The rapper is on tour with Florida Georgia Line and was scheduled to perform Saturday in Ridgefield, Wash

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An Appreciation of Tom Petty: Rock’s Superstar Everyman

An Appreciation of Tom Petty: Rock's Superstar Everyman

Tom Petty may have been the least polarizing figure in rock history. Literally everyone else you could cite has a substantial “not a fan” base, from Dylan to Springsteen, Bowie to Bono. And the very nature of the eternal Beatles-vs.-Stones debate attests that there will always be someone, somewhere, immutably meh on Mick and McCartney. But there’s an argument to be made that Petty almost never caused an argument, at least not among music fans. To never have fallen for the bicoastal boy who sang about that girl raised on promises, you might as well confess to not giving a rip about American music.

For someone with such an unwavering core persona, Petty had plenty of micro-personas to latch onto. Remember when he and the Heartbreakers came out of the gate 40 years ago — if you’re of a certain age — and the question was whether they were all about the Byrds-ian jangle-rock, or a power pop band, or actual new wavers? (The New York Times, in reviewing an early Manhattan club show where Petty opened for Roger McGuinn, used the headline to try to split the difference: “Tom Petty’s Pop Punk Rock Evokes Sounds of ‘60s.”)

But by the early 1980s, it was clear there was so much more than even those early indicators could suggest. Stardom gave way to superstardom as he embraced bluesier, more swaggering rock or neo-psychedelia, or fully developed his singer/songwriter bona fides. Taking a brief break from the Heartbreakers, he borrowed Jeff Lynne’s vocal-stacking techniques to put an extra spin on some of rock’s most essential anthems. As the kid brother in the Traveling Wilburys, he became an impish peer to four of the greatest talents in the half-generation before him. He seemed to go through life, and rock, with the slightest perpetual smirk… but if you didn’t relate to his Rickenbacker or his wit, you were probably won over by his “Wildflowers.” That mid-period acoustic solo music felt as delicate and emotional as the Heartbeakers’ signature sounds felt loud, precise, thrashy, and utterly liberating.

Tom Petty may have been the least polarizing figure in rock history. Literally everyone else you could cite has a substantial “not a fan” base, from Dylan to Springsteen, …

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Musicians Pay Mourn ‘Hero’ Tom Petty: ‘This Is Unbearable’

Tom Petty Dead

Musicians mourned the loss of rock icon Tom Petty with an outpouring of tributes on social media.

The Gainesville, Fla., native suffered a heart attack Sunday at his home in Malibu, Calif. He was transferred to UCLA Medical Center-Santa Monica, where he was on life support until he died Monday evening at age 66.

Although Petty’s actual time of death was 8:40 p.m. PT on Monday, several media outlets reported that Petty had died earlier in the day, leading to a premature wave of statements and tributes. At his time of death, Petty was “surrounded by family, his bandmates, and friends,” according to Tony Dimitriades, the longtime manager of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

“It’s shocking, crushing news,” Bob Dylan said in a statement. “I thought the world of Tom. He was a great performer, full of the light, a friend, and I’ll never forget him.”

“This is unbearable,” Sheryl Crow wrote on Twitter. “Vegas and now a great music hero has passed. You brought us so much joy, [Tom Petty]. We will miss you.”

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In the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, at least 58 people have died and more than 500 were injured after a gunman opened

A police officer runs along a sidewalk near a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, in Las VegasShooting, Las Vegas, USA - 01 Oct 2017

In the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, at least 58 people have died and more than 500 were injured after a gunman opened fire on attendees of the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival near the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas on Sunday night.

Police named Stephen Paddock, 64, as the gunman, and said that the Mesquite, Nev., resident was now dead by his own hand. A motive for the attack remains unclear.

According to local reports, the concertgoers were shot with a high-powered assault rifle from the 32nd floor of the hotel. Police responded to the incident about 10 p.m. local time. Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Undersheriff Kevin McMahill told CNN that officers on the ground saw that the shots were coming from the hotel. A SWAT team then stormed the hotel room in which Paddock was holed up.

“We believe the individual killed himself prior to our entry,” Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said, adding that at least 10 guns were found in the room.

A Las Vegas hospital first reported that two people were killed in the attack, with 24 injured. But as the night wore on, the death toll was increased to 20, and then “in excess of 50.” Police said 406 people were taken to local hospitals.

Lombardo told reporters that Paddock was believed to be “the sole aggressor” and that police had “no idea what his belief system was.” McMahill said that checks in Nevada and nationwide had yielded “no derogatory history” on Paddock.

Read more At Least 58 Dead, 500 Injured at Las Vegas Country Music Festival (Updated)

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Hillary Clinton criticized the National Riffle Association on Monday morning while offering her condolences to the victims of a

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton criticized the National Riffle Association on Monday morning while offering her condolences to the victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas this weekend that left at least 50 people dead and more than 400 people injured.

“Our grief isn’t enough,” the former Democratic Party presidential candidate tweeted. “We can and must put politics aside, stand up to the NRA, and work together to try to stop this from happening again.”

Clinton’s statement was one of the most politically charged among prominent politicians who weighed in on social media in the hours after the attack. She writes in her book “What Happened” about how the United States needs to change its gun laws to prevent mass shootings.

Barack Obama and Bill Clinton also tweeted their support for the victims.

“Michelle & I are praying for the victims in Las Vegas,” Obama tweeted. “Our thoughts are with their families & everyone enduring another senseless tragedy.”

“Thinking of the victims and responders in Las Vegas,” Bill Clinton tweeted. “This should be unimaginable in America.”

Read more Hillary Clinton Slams NRA While Offering Condolences to Las Vegas Shooting Victims

 

 

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Country musicians and other entertainment industry affiliates woke up Monday morning to news of the deadliest mass shooting in U.

Police officers advise people to take cover near the scene of a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Country musicians and other entertainment industry affiliates woke up Monday morning to news of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. Sunday night a gunman opened fire on attendees of the Route 91 Harvest Music Festival in Las Vegas.

Police named Stephen Paddock, 64, as the gunman, and said that the Mesquite, Nev., resident was now dead by his own hand. A motive for the attack remains unclear.

Celebrities quickly took to social media to react to the tragic event.

“There are no words to express the helplessness and sorrow my broken heart feels for the victims in Vegas and their families,” Taylor Swift tweeted.

“Woke up to such horrible news,” Carrie Underwood wrote. “We are praying for the victims and their families. May the Lord bring some comfort to them.”

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